Camping

Patuxent River Park – Pavilion and Camp Ground

Now the campground at Patuxent River Park is an interesting place.  You can only camp here in a tent, no RVs, and your neighbours can be right next to you at busy times of the year.  We went during mid summer and there was only one other family camping a few trees down.  Someone had a big cookout at the Pavilion but they did that when we were out exploring the area. All in all, it was a very pleasant 3 day vacation.

The park has a wide range of amenities for the public to use at a reasonable cost. There are countless miles of scenic woodland trails for hikers, bicyclists, and horseback riders. The park provides facilities for tent camping and picnics and large indoor and outdoor gatherings. There are places to fish that offer good tidal fishing year-round. Each camp site is provided free firewood by the park ranger every day.

The American Indian Village at Patuxent River Park

Things to do

  • The American Indian Village at Patuxent River Park is a replication of an Early American Indian Eastern Woodland Village. The different building and village exhibits give visitors a visual opportunity to explore the history of the Indigenous people of Prince George’s County, Maryland.
  • Mount Calvert Historical & Archaeological Park offers visitors the experience of seeing history being discovered by archaeologists working on an active excavation. You can see archaeologists uncover the past of American Indians, an early colonial town, and an 18th and 19th century Prince George’s County tobacco plantation.
  • The Patuxent Water Trail is a self-guided paddling trail designed for kayaking and canoeing enthusiasts. It allows paddlers to explore the Patuxent River and experience its beauty, camp along its banks and visit its numerous parks, historic sites, sanctuaries, and refuges.
  • Patuxent Rural Life Museums are a collection of museums and farm buildings that are composed of the W. Henry Duvall Tool Museum, a Blacksmith Shop with Farrier & Tack Shop, the Tobacco Farming Museum, Duckett Log Cabin with its privy, chicken coop, and meat house, a 1923 Sears catalog house, and the Hunting, Fishing, and Trapping Museum: Working the River.