Les Misérables by Victor Hugo

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Les Misérables, translated from the French as The Miserable Ones, The Wretched, The Poor Ones, The Wretched Poor, or The Victims , is an 1862 French novel by author Victor Hugo and is widely considered one of the greatest novels of the 19th century. It follows the lives and interactions of several French characters over a twenty-year period in the early 19th century, starting in 1815.

The Rat Pack

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We salute the Rat Pack, a group of actors and musicians originally centered on Humphrey Bogart. In the mid-1960s it was the name used by the press and the general public to refer to a later group of entertainers after Bogart’s death. They called themselves several different names and centered around Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis, Jr., Peter Lawford, and Joey Bishop. They often appeared together on stage and in films in the early-1960s, including the movie Ocean’s 11. Sinatra, Martin and Davis were regarded as the group’s lead members.

The Pursuit of Diarmuid and Gráinne

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An epic tale from the Fenian Cycle of Irish mythology, it’s story of love, lust, broken trust, relentless passion and ultimate tragedy. Like all such stories which live a long life, and this story is at least seventeen centuries old, it concerns a love triangle. A familiar triangle, the old king, his young wife, the trusted knight. The three involved in our story are the great Fionn mac Cumhaill (Finn Mac Cool in English), the beautiful but headstrong Grainne, and the noble young warrior, Diarmuid Ua Duibhne. It’s a saga of magic, sorcery, murderous mayhem, bloody vengeance, relentless pursuit and a final act of treachery.

Star-Crossed Lovers

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Romeo and Juliet does not make a specific moral statement about the relationships between love and society, religion, and family; rather, it portrays the chaos and passion of being in love, combining images of love, violence, death, religion, and family in an impressionistic rush leading to the play’s tragic conclusion.

Seven Days a Week

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Did you ever wonder why we have seven days in a week? As it turns out the seven day week is based on the moon and not the sun. There are 29 days to the moons cycle which breaks down into 4 seven day periods with 1 day of what is called a New Moon (also called the Dark Moon) and is not visible as there is no sun light is being reflected to earth from its surface.

The Seven Ages of Man

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Seven Ages of Man is from the romantic comedy “As You Like It”, written by William Shakespeare. It is set in the forest of Arden, where the senior Duke lives in exile with a band of loyal courtiers. These lines are spoken by one of the characters, Jaques, who is given to a lot of philosophizing.

The Three Witches

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The three witches in Macbeth are present in only four scenes in the play, but Macbeth’s fascination with them motivates much of the play’s action. When they meet with Banquo and Macbeth, they address Macbeth with three titles: thane of Glamis, thane of Cawdor, and king hereafter…